Thursday, July 26, 2012

To Market, To Market, We Will Go!


Trisha Beausart

DIG is the ideal place to start and advance a career. Between the industry and schools exhibiting, DIG showcases a growing industry that is in demand. Experts, amateurs, and students can network and explore opportunities and advances in their respective fields.

The digital interactive industry is full of “research and Innovation jobs.” A recent report by Toronto Region Research Alliance, “Research & Innovation Jobs: Opportunities and Challenges in the Toronto Region Labour Market,” outlines the definition for a research and innovation job as:

“[an occupation] that incorporate elements of either research or innovation . . . in science and technology fields, and require university or college studies. R&I jobs fall within the broader scope of ‘knowledge economy’ jobs, which can be identified as those jobs requiring higher levels of knowledge and/or training and a broadly based skill set.”


According to TRRA’s report, DIG industries are one of the technologically-advanced industries experiencing a growing demand for skilled and talented workers. The report proves that it is not your grandparents’ job market. Rewind to a generation or two ago, and DIG industries barely existed. Now, specialized degrees are the standard, as is a passion and drive to succeed in the chosen field against amplified competition. In addition to the new standards, is how social media has changed the way the younger population approach employment. Employees find fulfillment and inspiration through social engagement. Work and leisure have become inextricably linked, and what we do in our “off-hours” affects and shapes what we do while we are “on the clock.”

Knowledge-based are now about fulfilment and interest, rather than about just about “bringing home the bacon.” However, in the IT industry, the bacon is a nice addition. According to a recent article run by the Globe and Mail, “Six Jobs with Six-Figure Salariesin Tech and Digital Worlds,” “[the] 2012 Salary Guide, by Robert Half Technology and the Creative Group, found that information architects, data-security analysts and user-experience (UX) designers often enjoy compensation of $100,000 or more. “ As well, “[the] high pay reflects the high demand for workers with these skills, as companies invest more in information technology and the digital world.” It is no wonder that the research-and-innovation job market is booming. Between increased access to specialized-post secondary education and the Ontario Media Development Corporation’s (OMDC) investment in the industry, the talent for the sector is in high demand as job opportunities are plentiful.

It is because of the industry growth, partiality, and availability of R&I jobs in Canada that the DIG conference is relevant, and growing every year. With the focus on the various branches of the digital interactive development sector, DIG is the ideal event to attend. The conference supports information-sharing, networking, and a collaborative experience as individuals at all stages and levels in the industry can discuss and show what they’re passionate about. As well, job-seekers can have their questions answered in-person about what it takes to break into the market, and how to succeed once there. All participants at the conference are keenly aware of the significance of their professions in the growing and changing entertainment and business worlds, especially at a time when other professions are not as stable moving forward. Taking into consideration the market and demand for tech-centric jobs, DIG is the best career move you’ll make this year. 

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